Mental Health

Does Your Child Have a Mental Health Condition? How to Make Sure Both You, and Your Child, Are Ready for School

Providing support and guidance for a child with a mental health condition is a critical part of recovery.  As a parent/caregiver, it is important that you work towards providing your child with the best school environment that is possible. To do so, it is important to be prepared for the upcoming school year.

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July 25th, 2016||

Is it Mental Illness or Aging?

As our loved ones age, it’s natural for some changes to occur. Regular forgetfulness is one thing, however; persistent memory loss or cognitive impairment is another thing and potentially serious. The same goes for extreme anxiety or long-term depression. Caregivers should keep an eye out for the following warning signs, which could indicate a mental health concern:

  • Sad or depressed mood lasting longer than two weeks
  • Social withdrawal; loss of interest in things that used to be enjoyable
  • Unexplained fatigue, energy loss, or sleep changes
  • Confusion, disorientation, problems with concentration or decision-making
  • Increase or decrease in appetite; changes in weight
  • Memory loss, especially recent or short-term memory problems
  • Feelings of worthlessness, inappropriate guilt, helplessness; thoughts of suicide
  • Physical problems that can’t otherwise be explained: aches, constipation, etc.
  • Changes in appearance or dress, or problems maintaining the home or yard
  • Trouble handling finances or working with numbers

Don’t hesitate to seek help if you or a loved one is experiencing any of the symptoms above. At all ages and stages of your life, having someone to talk to is important. If you are feeling sad, alone or depressed, we are here for you.

February 4th, 2016||

Find Your Holiday Happiness: Manage Anxiety and Depression

Feeling Stressed Out?

The holidays are an exciting time of good cheer, warm family traditions, and spending time with friends. Or, are they?

For many people, the idea of entering a crowded room and chatting up coworkers or strangers at a party, exchanging gifts with friends, traveling from home, or attending large family gatherings can produce intense anxiety, depression, or both.

Holiday parties are a common stressor, and they can be terrifying for people with anxiety disorders, particularly those who have social anxiety disorder. They may try anything to avoid such activities, but avoidance will only perpetuate fear. Although some report that the holidays lift their spirits, many people say that the holiday season makes them feel very or a bit more anxious or depressed.

You can reduce some of your holiday worry and stress. Try these tips from the ADAA, click here.

December 25th, 2015||